Teachers lead the training at Edcamp

Class was in session on a clear, pleasant Saturday at Grand Junction’s Central High even though the school’s students were nowhere to be found. More than 80 area educators volunteered for an extra day in the classroom to take part in a teacher-led form of professional development sweeping that nation called Edcamp.

Edcamp participants start the day by choosing their training topics

Edcamp participants start the day by choosing their training topics

“It was our very first Edcamp today in Mesa Valley and I was wondering what it was going to be like. I’ve been teaching for a lot of years and I’d never seen one done. I loved it,” said Anne Djokic, a teacher at Clifton Elementary. “My favorite moment was the energy at the start when everybody was talking about education, about students. There was a sincere cacophony of excitement to be here on a Saturday, on our own time, sitting in a high school library and getting ready to talk about what’s best for kids, what’s best for teachers, and how to get there.”

Edcamp bills itself as the ‘unconference’ according to its foundation website (edcamp.org). Unlike traditional conferences, the Edcamp agenda is created by the participants at the start of the event. Built on principles of connected and participatory learning, Edcamp brings educators together to talk about the things that matter most to them: their interests, passions, and questions. The training centers on an expectation that the people in the room will work together to build understanding by sharing their own knowledge.

A group breakout session on student behavior, moderated by CEA's Casey Kilpatrick

A group breakout session on student behavior, moderated by CEA’s Casey Kilpatrick

Edcamp in Grand Junction was hosted by the Mesa Valley Education Association for all teachers, student teachers, education support professionals, and administrators throughout Mesa Valley County School District 51. “It’s exciting because the training is timely, it’s relevant, and teachers are getting to choose what’s going to impact their classroom the next day,” said MVEA President Darren Cook. “And it helps kids when teachers get to improve their professional practices.”

The training started in Grand Junction in typical Edcamp fashion with classmates posting notes on a board stating the topics they wanted to learn more about. The day’s courses were decided and people stepped up to teach them. Becky Johnson started with Google Docs and Apps, sharing how the technology is “transforming teaching and learning and East Middle School” by allowing students to create and present in multi-media platforms.

Becky Johnson leads the class on Google Docs

Becky Johnson leads the class on Google Docs

“Our kids just finished a project on plate tectonics, where they developed a presentation, wrote explanatory paragraphs, and made a webpage,” explained Johnson. “They are products that work together and that’s the nice thing about it. Once you are signed into your Google Apps account, you have access to this whole universe.”

“I had never heard of Google Docs before,” said Cheyanne Gentry, a teacher at Grand Junction High who enjoyed the Edcamp push toward networking and camaraderie. “I have lesson plan ideas exploding in my brain.

“This is a great way to energize people,” Gentry added. “I connected with people I hadn’t seen in a long time, I made a new friend. I’m just really excited and happy that I came. Edcamp was worth giving up a Saturday.”

Bill Johnson finds shared interests in Edcamp discussion

Bill Johnson finds shared interests in Edcamp discussion

“I had a great time today learning new ideas and meeting new teachers, networking with them,” agreed Bill Johnson, a science teacher at Fruita Monument High. “On things that I truly battle every weekend, it’s good to find out other teachers are battling the same problems. I love the MVEA’s new vision and effort in training, and getting proactive in issues that concern all of us every day.”

The Edcampers broke down their issues and concerns in small-group discussions, scattered in classrooms throughout the high school. Topics of interest included navigating Colorado’s educator effectiveness evaluation system, managing challenging student behaviors, and diving into the district’s gifted and talented program offerings. Changing technology, though, is a popular theme throughout Edcamps as educators strive to bring the latest high-tech tool into the classroom that will engage their students and possibly lighten the heavy instruction load. In fact, Aurora Education Association teamed up with its district’s education technology department to host an Edcamp centered on sharing and learning with digital tools and resources.

At the Mesa Valley Edcamp, ‘ActivInspire’ and ‘Padlets’ were some of the brand names seemingly pulled from science fiction that captivated the imagination on what is now possible in classroom management. Younger MVEA members like Katie Allen were often at the front of class explaining their capabilities to older colleagues.

Catherine Gardner (second from right) takes in ideas to bring technology into her classroom

Catherine Gardner (second from right) takes in ideas to bring technology into her classroom

Catherine Gardner, a media specialist at Grand Mesa Middle, sat in on a session to learn about Quia, an online education platform offering 16 types of activities for teachers to customize to their classroom instruction and to create engaging, online practice games that motivate student learning. “I came to Edcamp with an open mind, not knowing what to expect, and I have had a fantastic day,” said Gardner. “I’ve been learning about instructional strategies and websites that I can take back and share with my teachers that will help engage students in the classroom.”

“The reason why this Edcamp was so successful is that every single teacher left with something to take back to the classroom and try on Monday,” added Allen. “It also invigorated the teachers and inspired them. We’re pushing each other to be more excited to get back in the classrooms and pass on that inspiration to our students.”

Joan Axthelm takes new Edcampers through an online orientation

Joan Axthelm takes new Edcampers through an online orientation

Edcamp’s rising popularity in the United States and in other countries is easy to view by searching #edcamp in social media. Professional development chosen by and led by teachers is getting people excited about what they learn and what they can do to become better teachers for their students. “We had more than 10 groups of people say they will continue the conversations they started today. They’re not just getting information, but using that information and checking back to ask, ‘Hey, how did this work for you?’” said teacher Joan Axthelm, an organizer of the Mesa Valley Edcamp. “Here’s a bunch of folks that came out on a Saturday. They aren’t with their families today, they aren’t relaxing. They’re taking time to make sure they continue to learn and get better as teachers so their students can be the best learners they can be.”

After training, three teachers of Orchard Mesa Middle stopped at the official Edcamp trailer parked outside the school to reflect on the day’s events. “I never had tweeted before – I now know how to tweet so that’s exciting, being old and not social networking much,” Krysti Klueber said with laugh. “Every one of the things I did was beneficial and I’m very excited about this way to do professional learning. It was a Saturday well spent.”

Pittman, Klueber and Nicholson after Edcamp

Pittman, Klueber and Nicholson after Edcamp

“I feel like that too. I came away with something from every single session that I can take back to my classroom and use immediately,” Heather Nicholson agreed.

“Some of the content I already knew about, so it was nice for me to be able to help some of my fellow colleagues along,” added Becky Pittman. “I was also excited about the vision and seeing where things need to go in our district.”

The child is the winner when teachers gather together to find best ways to teach and make the best practices even better for students, concluded Djokic. “You want a teacher in your classroom who believes in the Edcamp because that means he or she believes in the profession. This is the wave of the future and the future is here. Edcamp is the way to make sure that students get the benefit from our time spent learning together.

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